Golden Hour and Nightfall in Arequipa’s Plaza de Armas

As a whole Cusco is more picturesque, but Arequipa’s main square, or Plaza de Armas, was my favorite spot in Peru. Perhaps the only other main plaza that I’ve loved as much as Arequipa’s was in Salamanca, Spain. 

Arequipa, the second biggest city in Peru, became a rich and important city because of its key position in the wool trade with England in the 1800s (what century is that?)

Main squares in Peru are called “Plaza de Armas” (weapons square) because they are where the army used to hold its marches and demonstrations. Arequipa’s was special to me because of the double-decker arched corridors on two sides and the city’s Cathedral on the northern side.

Which of the GRAPES (Geography, Religion, Art/Architecture/Achievements, Economics, Political Systems, Social Structure) do you see in this post? Why could Golden Hour (when the sun is setting) be considered Geography? P4171148 (1).JPGP4171138 (1).JPG
OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Catedral on the left turning pink as the sun sets.

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Catedral with the famous palm trees in the foreground
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Other tourists taking advantage of Golden Hour
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The Plaza de Armas from a restaurant’s balconyOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA
My favorite picture from Peru!OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERA

 

 

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